Pictures of an exhibition

3 11 2013

Thank you — friends, supporters, studio fans, and patrons — from the bottom of my heart. These are a few images of yesterday’s enjoyable opening day of “Hana Hou: Then & Now” at Ho’omaluhia Botanical Garden.

20131103-130137.jpg

20131103-130155.jpg

Panorama Hana Hou

20131103-130403.jpg

20131103-130452.jpg

20131103-130524.jpg

20131103-130544.jpg

20131103-130559.jpg

20131103-130615.jpg

20131103-130627.jpg

20131103-130656.jpg

20131103-130716.jpg

20131103-130751.jpg

20131103-130807.jpg

20131103-130830.jpg

20131103-130845.jpg

20131103-130857.jpg

20131103-130910.jpg

20131103-130929.jpg

20131103-130939.jpg

20131103-131002.jpg

20131103-131038.jpg

Advertisements




Clouds lifting over Lanihuli

5 08 2011

I wonder if it is true that in olden times the waterfalls of windward Oahu ran all the time. Olden times meaning before water was diverted to the Ewa plain for sugar cane and land development. At the present intersection of Kahekili and Likelike highways, while waiting at a red light, a rain storm typical of our wet season had just stopped and the clouds lifted to reveal a spectacular scene of the Koolau mountains. I was on my way to Hoomaluhia Botanical Garden at Luluku and made up my mind to hold the vision in my memory so I could paint it. For in just a few quarters of an hour the sun came out again and the waterfalls disappeared.

"Clouds Lifting Over Lanihuli" 16" x 20" Oil on Canvas (unfinished)

UPDATE, September 11, 2011: As you will see in my 9/11/2011 post, I have made some changes to this painting, and I think you may like the finished work better. Thanks for visiting Rebekah’s Studio.

Copyright 2011 Rebekah Luke




Lifelong learning about my art process

10 08 2010

Kaaawa Valley Morning

Some things take a long time. Waiting for an oil painting to dry is one of them. Here is “Kaaawa Valley Morning.” I painted it in May and varnished it this week. It’s already sold to a happy family waiting patiently to hang it in their home!

Oil paint takes at least three months to dry. A painted canvas should be bone dry before adding a protective varnish coat, for best results. So when commissioning an original painting, allow at least six months for delivery. That would be the technical aspect. As for the practical aspect, each artist has his/her own process that varies from artist to artist. Perhaps plan on a little longer.

Last Thursday I was happy to see Kit Kowalke, among other lovely friends, at our art reception at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden. I first met Kit, an artist and art educator, when she was teaching at Honolulu Community College and I was in university relations. She was always cheerful, always a pleasure to be around, always sharing and helpful, always fun! And she still is.

She asked what medium, I said oil, she asked how do I paint, I said one at a time. That is, I like to finish one painting before starting another. And that my paintings take a long time to dry. Oil painters often switch to acrylic because the medium dries quickly, and they can get their work out on the market faster. Personally, I’ve been partial to oil because of the way the colors mix and look.

What I didn’t say was that I don’t like the state of unfinished-ness, or that unfinished projects are stressful to me.

“Oh!” Kit told me, “no need to paint one at a time, you can paint more than one at a time. Like two or three.”

“I can?!” 😕

“Yes!” she said. “Sometimes you might want to let an oil dry before painting on it some more. While you wait, start another one. Go back and forth.”

Well, that’s a perspective I’ll consider. And, I think that will ease my stress over things like unfinished home and garden remodeling projects. I can think of them as works in progress!

She asked more questions and gave me more tips, even volunteered which classes and workshops I could attend nearby. Which is what my intention was when I first left art school—to regularly keep my eye in training by always taking part in a studio class.

It is the advice given also by my tai chi sifu Alex Dong, who advocates not waiting until you have mastered a set before learning a new one because there are aspects of each set that help in understanding other sets. Or, (my interpretation) you will always be improving on the basics. Clicking on the above link to his website takes you to his journal article about the subject.

Somewhat similarly, when I was taking beginning kumidaiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) lessons and had an interest in composing, I asked the master Kenny Endo at what level one could start composing. How long must I study taiko before I would have enough knowledge to write drum music? He replied he believed one could start composing at any level.

Some things to think about. In my case, they still may take time because that’s my process. So far.

Copyright 2010 Rebekah Luke

Quite a few images are ready to leave the studio; these paintings are dry!  See my PAINTINGS page. If you are on Oahu, visit the art show at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden during August 2010. Please see my previous post about seven artists.





If it’s Thursday, it must be Ho‘omaluhia!

9 07 2010

View of the Ko‘olau Mountains from Ho‘omaluhia

My painting group and I are busy putting together an August exhibition of our artwork at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center in Kaneohe, Oahu. It opens on August 3, with a punch-and-cookies reception on August 5 (Thursday) from noon to 2 p.m. If you are in the area, please come to see it! If time permits, see the garden too. You may click on the garden link above to read about the garden, and on the link below for details of the art show. – Rebekah

CLICK FOR THE INVITATION





Peace begins with me

14 03 2010

Already the middle of March and approaching the equinox! Good fortune has indeed gathered at the front door since the lunar year began.

My fortunes include a potential gallery venue to show my paintings this year, freelance copy editing and proofreading income, and an extra green trash can from a neighbor for our garden trimmings, just when I wished for them!

I checked in with Oprah and enjoyed a couple of her interviews with Thich Nhat Hanh that you might like too. Here are the links:

oprah.com/spirit/Oprah-Talks-To-Thich-Nhat-Hanh

oprah.com/spirit/A-Conversation-with-Thich-Nhat-Hanh-About-Savor

What else is new in this light?

I am reading Jamling Tenzing Norgay’s book Touching My Father’s Soul, on loan from another good neighbor who has trekked in Nepal. He promises I’ll like it — the book (agreed) and the trekking (if only . . . now that’s what I call a goal!). You may click on the title to read some reviews.

Our granddaughter, who comes to the studio several times a week now when her parents are away at work, turned 10 months, and she’s so tickled to walk on her own. Look out, world! I find myself reflecting on my toddlerhood — yes, I can remember all they way back to then — and appreciate all the more the extended family, uncle, aunt, and neighbors, who took care of me.

Which brings to mind a new meditation I’m doing. It’s called “Installing Inner Game” by Devon White. You may check it out at this website: www.gogratitude.org/devon. It requires T-O-T, time on task. So far I have listened to the 70-minute audio message and read the manual one time each. Although I’ve just started this program, my guess is that it helps take you all the way back to who you were in the beginning, as well as all the way forward in terms of becoming and being at your best to fulfill your life’s purpose. How cool is that?! We all need healing every day.

So not only good fortune, but peace at the front door as well. Thank you!

Tropical Hawaiian Ti Plants

Here’s a painting of tropical Hawaiian ti plants I finished on location this week, just as a sudden downpour drenched everything and left me in a puddle.

Copyright 2010 Rebekah Luke







%d bloggers like this: