Ultra art in downtown Honolulu

7 03 2018

The second floor lobby at Pauahi Tower in Honolulu, at 1003 Bishop Street, is home until August 3 for a selection of original fine art by local artists.

The location is convenient for downtown office workers who might walk over during lunch hour for some quiet visual meditation.

The lobby with its high ceilings and window walls lends itself to large pieces. Consider that my “large” contribution of “Royal Archival Banyan” in oil is hanging in a beautiful koa display case.

Display case features both two- and three-dimensional works.

Glass case containing 2D and 3D art reflects high-rise downtown parking garage for a fourth dimension.

Unusual art that caught my eye were a collage by David Friedman, and three smaller pieces: a fish and a couple of decorated fishing floats.

Collage art by David Friedman

Spheres, one a former fishing float.


Windward Artists Guild and Wendy Roberts organized the exhibit entitled Ultra Exhibit I. Katherine Love was the curator.

For information about purchasing any of the art, please email Wendy Roberts at wag@windwardartistsguild.org

If you go: Alii Place parking garage has reasonable fees. Enter from the right hand lane of Alakea street between King and Hotel streets. Pauahi Tower is one block from Alakea on Bishop street.



Coming home

14 02 2018

From time to time I like to travel off island from Oahu.

In November we went to New York City, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Baltimore. And last week we went to Austin, TX, for a destination wedding.

Equally exciting is coming home. I always book a window seat on the starboard side of the plane for aerial views of the island.

This time I was rewarded with a beautiful clear day for these fine resolution photos made with my iPhone6s.

Puffy white clouds

The Moku Lua off Lanikai Beach; Mokapu peninsula in the distance


Beautiful Koʻolau Range



On being Hawaiian

9 01 2018

Hawaiians are gearing up for a ceremonial observance on January 17 of the overthrow of Queen Liliʻuokalani 125 year’s ago. I am Hawaiian.

I won’t be marching from Mauna Ala down Nuuanu Avenue and King street to Iolani Palace as I did in 1993 for the 100th observance, but I will be near the Iolani Palace bandstand in an information booth set up by the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee. I am a citizen of Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi.

Last night I attended the first of several Mele Workshops taught by Kumu Hinaleimoana Wong to learn more about the songs of our nation. She entitled it “I Welo Mau Loa Kuʻu Hae Hawaiʻi / May my Hawaiian flag fly evermore…”

Kumu Hina

Kumu Hina wrote, “No matter the politics that divide us, let us unite through the bonds of our language, culture and our history.”

Mahalo e Kumu Hina.

I am compelled to encourage citizens to attend one of the remaining free workshops scheduled on Oahu. They are open to all. You will learn the songs, what the Hawaiian lyrics mean, and the tertiary kaona of the words. Kumu Hina’s manaʻo is inspiring and uplifting.

Schedule of Mele Workshops. Go!

125 years ago was not that long ago, Kumu Hina pointed out. When it was revealed at the workshop that I was the eldest person in the room, she said, “your grandparents’ generation.”

Yes, my maternal Chinese grandfather spoke Hawaiian, but his 15 children were forbidden to speak it in school. Unfortunately, I do not ʻōlelo either, but I love to sing Hawaiian songs.

ʻOnipaʻa kākou.

If you go ~ As I write this, the schedule of events for January 17, 2018, is flexible, except for the 10:45 a.m. raising of Hae Hawaiʻi at ʻIolani Palace, the exact time it was lowered and replaced by the American flag in 1893.


A show that celebrates peace and calm

6 01 2018

The Hoʻomaluhia New Year Invitational 2018 art show opened today with works depicting—you guessed it—Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden! At the base of the Koʻolau Mountains on Oʻahu, the park’s natural beauty is a “can’t miss” subject for any artist.

Go to the visitor center main gallery between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. any day this month through January 26 to view an inspired collection of works, including two of my oil paintings pictured below. Many are for sale. Greg Pai is the juror.

The public is invited to a reception from 4 to 6 p.m. on Sunday, January 14.

Hoʻomaluhia means “let’s make peace and tranquility.” Enter the park at the end of Luluku Road in Kāneʻohe.

Mahalo for taking an interest in art! ~ Rebekah

“Clouds Lifting Over Lanihuli” reveal fresh waterfalls. 20″x 16” oil on canvas by Rebekah Luke

“Rain Fantasy,” 24″ x 18″ oil on canvas by Rebekah Luke


Welcome 2018

1 01 2018

Welcome 2018, studio fans. Wishing you peace, a lot of hope, and more love this new year.

View from the studio near the end of 2017. The waterfall started from the mega rainfall we had on the island.

In midtown Manhattan, a couple takes a selfie. Remember to LOVE.


Beauty at Longwood Gardens

27 11 2017

Whenever we’re in this part of Pennsylvania we pay a visit to Longwood Gardens. This time the designers decorated the halls and conservatories for the holidays for “A Longwood Christmas.”

We went in the afternoon and imagined how lovely it is at nighttime with the Christmas lights. No matter what the season, it is always a treat to see. Here’s my album.

Floating green apples and red cranberries for a design

Green apples and walnuts afloat in water

Close up of Christmas tree made of succulents

Phalaenopsis orchids cover this tree

Close up of the orchid tree

Amaryllis buds

Glass ornaments made by children

Merry Christmas


Life along a river

25 11 2017

Our journey brings us to the Chesapeake Bay/Severn River/Herald Harbor neighborhood. A morning walk with Poe and his master Dave revealed weekend homes along the river for the affluent and streets named after trees. The crisp air and red-leafed maple trees are sure reminders that we are not in Hawaii. Take a look at these beautiful views.


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