The art goes on on the Windward side

3 10 2017

The Windward Artists Guild’s current exhibition at Hoomaluhia Botanical Garden’s Visitor Center main gallery features the visual art of 49 of its members through October 28. It is open from 9 am to 4 pm daily.

A reception will be held from 4 to 6 pm on Saturday, October 21, when visitors may meet the artists.

The entrance to the garden is at the end of Luluku Road between Pali and Likelike highways in Kaneohe, Oahu.

It’s beautiful show.

My “Royal Archival Banyan” (top center) is making the gallery rounds, but this is the first time with the Windward Artists Guild.

Paper collage is among the variety of art media.

“Birdsong” in stoneware by Dagmar Kau

Intriguing 3-dimensional works

“Stormy” raku ceramic by Barbara Guidage

Many of the art works are for sale. Contact Cynthia Schubert at c_schubertrichmond@hotmail.com

I love this whimsical triptych “Les Trois Parapluies” by Cindy Mochel-Livermore. Too bad it’s NFS.

 

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Relaxation at Bellow Beach Park

5 09 2017

Bellows Beach Park at Waimanalo, Oahu, remains a favorite picnic venue for local folks. Here is my photo record of a most relaxing day with friends this Labor Day. Lucky we live Hawaii.

Joe and Girly’s gang at Bellows every Labor Day and Memorial Day. It’s a standing invitation. Sun, surf, shade, barbecue, libations, music all day long.

 

The Moku Lua punctuate tints of veridian, cobalt, and ultramarine of the sea and sky.

 

Restful tideline

Bodysurfing anyone?

 

Bellows is popular with families.

 

🙂

 

The view toward Makapu‘u with skies so clear we could see Moloka‘i, Lana‘i, and Maui islands in the distance beneath the clouds.

 

Catch a wave!

 

Salmon belly on the grill

 

Roasting veggies

 

“‘Okole Maluna” means “Bottoms Up.”

 

Yummy

Mahalo e Ke Akua.





Master paintings of the 1800s at the Bishop Museum

2 04 2017

For the final project in the Painting II class I teach, students select a painting of a master to copy using the grid system and painting section by section. The unveiling was yesterday at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum.

Nancy Alejo chose Camille Pissarro’s “The Red Roofs,” 1877, and Bernadette Chan picked Paul Gauguin’s “Parau api (Two Women of Tahiti),” 1892.

“The Red Roofs” by Nancy Alejo after Camille Pissarro

A segment of “Parau api (Two Women of Tahiti)” by Bernadette Chan after Paul Gauguin

My students selected these works independently from each other, but in their presentation, we learned that Pissarro and Gauguin became friends in 1873 and painted together. Pissarro painted with the Impressionists. Gauguin had no formal art training, and his work is post-Impressionist, flat, hard edged and considered symbolic. Pissarro gave money to Gauguin to go to Tahiti.

While at the Bishop Museum we visited The Picture Gallery on the top floor of the entrance tower of Hawaiian Hall. My favorite paintings were the landscapes by D. Howard Hitchcock and the still lifes of fruit dear to my heart (because I have had mountain apples and breadfruit in my own garden) by Margaret Girvin Gillian.

The Picture Gallery at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum. Fascinating old images of Hawaii may be viewed here.

If you go:
See www.bishopmuseum.org for how to get there and for ticket information. Admission is free on Pauahi’s birthday, Dec. 19.
From Waikiki you may take the No. 2 bus and ask the driver to let you off on School street at Kapalama street. Walk downhill toward the ocean to Bernice street and turn right to the entrance at 1525 Bernice Street.





Road trip: Kaaawa to Kaneohe

16 03 2017

On the way to the vet starting around 7:30 in the morning I made these images to show the scenery along the 35-minute commute. Kaneohe is about half way to Honolulu from Kaaawa on the windward side of Oahu. Kamehameha Highway had no traffic until after Heeia, where it backed up from the first traffic signal at Haiku Road. DH turned left at the Hygienic Store to avoid road repair work on Kahekili Highway.

This old stand of ironwood trees, above, is a landmark at Kaaawa Valley, below. The moon hasn’t set yet.

Monkeypod trees seem to anchor Kanehoalani.

Sugar mill ruins at Kualoa Ranch

Mokolii islet in Kaneohe Bay 
Kualoa Ranch and highway views 


We turned left at the Hygienic Store.

Here’s some traffic.

Haiku Valley and Iolekaa Valley as seen from the intersection of Haiku Road and Kamehameha Highway. We’re in suburbia now! Windward Mall is just to the left outside if the photo.

Ah…just wanted to show you what it looked like when we returned to Kaaawa around noontime. It really looks like this. Thanks for coming along. Aloha ~ Rebekah





Join in the singing or come as the audience

14 03 2017

Festival/concert venue: Kawaiahao Church is on the corner of King and Punchbowl streets

Aloha Everyone!

Kawaiolaonāpūkanileo, our small Hawaiian-music choir presents Ke Ahe Lau Makani 2017. We invite you all to this Hawaiian choral festival on Sunday afternoon, March 26, 2017, at historic Kawaiahaʻo Church. Join us at 2pm to sing in the festival choir or at 6pm to hear this choir in concert!

The next rehearsal is at 5pm on Monday, March 20, at Na Mea Hawaii store at Ward Warehouse, Honolulu. All who love to sing Hawaiian music are welcome.

The cost is $20 to be a festival singer which includes music and a heavy pūpū before the concert. The concert at 6:00 pm is free.

Nola A. Nahulu is the director. Phil Hidalgo is the festival organizer.





A famous coconut

21 12 2016

Here’s the famous The Coconut dessert of Alan Wong’s restaurant in Honolulu. The occasion was Darling Husband’s (D.H.’s) 70th birthday dinner last evening. President Barack Obama, if he dines here as usual during Christmas vacation, is likely to enjoy this signature masterpiece, too. Reportedly, it’s his favorite!

Alan Wong's Coconut

The Coconut by Alan Wong’s: haupia sorbet in a shell of chocolate, served with fresh fruit in liliko‘i (passion fruit) sauce. How do they make it?!

 





Art in the reading room

7 07 2016

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The main branch of the Hawaii State Library on 478 S. King Street at Punchbowl street, downtown Honolulu, is the venue for a showing of art by the Windward Artists Guild. The works of sixteen artists, including me, are represented here in the Reading Room through July 29. It’s a tight show; all of the pieces are pictured in these two photos. Juror Richard Duggan awarded Wendy Roberts the top prize for her triptych, pictured below.

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My father brought me to this library nearly every weekend. It was a 45-minute car ride from Wahiawa in those days when I was a child. A library rat, he loved the periodical room and non-fiction. I explored the juvenile section and, when I was older, the stacks. I pored over the scripts of musical shows and was fascinated by the collection of music scores. I found the Hawaii and Pacific collection, and that became my favorite. All of that is still there, although the card catalog drawers have given way to computers, and the green-painted Adirondack chairs in the central courtyard are long gone. Funny how my art has brought me back to the enjoyment of reading ink-on-paper books.








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