Master paintings of the 1800s at the Bishop Museum

2 04 2017

For the final project in the Painting II class I teach, students select a painting of a master to copy using the grid system and painting section by section. The unveiling was yesterday at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum.

Nancy Alejo chose Camille Pissarro’s “The Red Roofs,” 1877, and Bernadette Chan picked Paul Gauguin’s “Parau api (Two Women of Tahiti),” 1892.

“The Red Roofs” by Nancy Alejo after Camille Pissarro

A segment of “Parau api (Two Women of Tahiti)” by Bernadette Chan after Paul Gauguin

My students selected these works independently from each other, but in their presentation, we learned that Pissarro and Gauguin became friends in 1873 and painted together. Pissarro painted with the Impressionists. Gauguin had no formal art training, and his work is post-Impressionist, flat, hard edged and considered symbolic. Pissarro gave money to Gauguin to go to Tahiti.

While at the Bishop Museum we visited The Picture Gallery on the top floor of the entrance tower of Hawaiian Hall. My favorite paintings were the landscapes by D. Howard Hitchcock and the still lifes of fruit dear to my heart (because I have had mountain apples and breadfruit in my own garden) by Margaret Girvin Gillian.

The Picture Gallery at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum. Fascinating old images of Hawaii may be viewed here.

If you go:
See www.bishopmuseum.org for how to get there and for ticket information. Admission is free on Pauahi’s birthday, Dec. 19.
From Waikiki you may take the No. 2 bus and ask the driver to let you off on School street at Kapalama street. Walk downhill toward the ocean to Bernice street and turn right to the entrance at 1525 Bernice Street.





Road trip: Kaaawa to Kaneohe

16 03 2017

On the way to the vet starting around 7:30 in the morning I made these images to show the scenery along the 35-minute commute. Kaneohe is about half way to Honolulu from Kaaawa on the windward side of Oahu. Kamehameha Highway had no traffic until after Heeia, where it backed up from the first traffic signal at Haiku Road. DH turned left at the Hygienic Store to avoid road repair work on Kahekili Highway.

This old stand of ironwood trees, above, is a landmark at Kaaawa Valley, below. The moon hasn’t set yet.

Monkeypod trees seem to anchor Kanehoalani.

Sugar mill ruins at Kualoa Ranch

Mokolii islet in Kaneohe Bay 
Kualoa Ranch and highway views 


We turned left at the Hygienic Store.

Here’s some traffic.

Haiku Valley and Iolekaa Valley as seen from the intersection of Haiku Road and Kamehameha Highway. We’re in suburbia now! Windward Mall is just to the left outside if the photo.

Ah…just wanted to show you what it looked like when we returned to Kaaawa around noontime. It really looks like this. Thanks for coming along. Aloha ~ Rebekah





Join in the singing or come as the audience

14 03 2017

Festival/concert venue: Kawaiahao Church is on the corner of King and Punchbowl streets

Aloha Everyone!

Kawaiolaonāpūkanileo, our small Hawaiian-music choir presents Ke Ahe Lau Makani 2017. We invite you all to this Hawaiian choral festival on Sunday afternoon, March 26, 2017, at historic Kawaiahaʻo Church. Join us at 2pm to sing in the festival choir or at 6pm to hear this choir in concert!

The next rehearsal is at 5pm on Monday, March 20, at Na Mea Hawaii store at Ward Warehouse, Honolulu. All who love to sing Hawaiian music are welcome.

The cost is $20 to be a festival singer which includes music and a heavy pūpū before the concert. The concert at 6:00 pm is free.

Nola A. Nahulu is the director. Phil Hidalgo is the festival organizer.





A famous coconut

21 12 2016

Here’s the famous The Coconut dessert of Alan Wong’s restaurant in Honolulu. The occasion was Darling Husband’s (D.H.’s) 70th birthday dinner last evening. President Barack Obama, if he dines here as usual during Christmas vacation, is likely to enjoy this signature masterpiece, too. Reportedly, it’s his favorite!

Alan Wong's Coconut

The Coconut by Alan Wong’s: haupia sorbet in a shell of chocolate, served with fresh fruit in liliko‘i (passion fruit) sauce. How do they make it?!

 





Art in the reading room

7 07 2016

image.jpeg

The main branch of the Hawaii State Library on 478 S. King Street at Punchbowl street, downtown Honolulu, is the venue for a showing of art by the Windward Artists Guild. The works of sixteen artists, including me, are represented here in the Reading Room through July 29. It’s a tight show; all of the pieces are pictured in these two photos. Juror Richard Duggan awarded Wendy Roberts the top prize for her triptych, pictured below.

image

My father brought me to this library nearly every weekend. It was a 45-minute car ride from Wahiawa in those days when I was a child. A library rat, he loved the periodical room and non-fiction. I explored the juvenile section and, when I was older, the stacks. I pored over the scripts of musical shows and was fascinated by the collection of music scores. I found the Hawaii and Pacific collection, and that became my favorite. All of that is still there, although the card catalog drawers have given way to computers, and the green-painted Adirondack chairs in the central courtyard are long gone. Funny how my art has brought me back to the enjoyment of reading ink-on-paper books.





Family time and touring with adult siblings

30 05 2016

The third leg of the trip “abroad” was a visit to Pennsylvania where DH Pete’s sister lives and his brother works.

(For the first and second legs, please head back to rebekahstravels.wordpress.com for my travelogue.)

The siblings were born four years apart. Their parents planned it that way for the purpose of affording college tuition. The one other time they toured together as adults was in 2004, after both parents died in Winter 2003. We arrived to spread Dad’s remaining ashes on Memorial Day and went back to the geographical middle of the state and found the family farm of yore.

So last week’s reunion was a special occasion. Penny and Paul took time off from work, and Paul drove in from New Jersey. We were honored.

I am not going to bore you with the family dynamics because every family has them. Suffice it to say that everyone was on their best behavior, and we didn’t discuss religion or politics! 😉

We had fun touring several visitor attractions in the area. Here are the pictures.

The Wharton Escherick Studio in Malvern, PA, work place of the late artist, is open as a small museum showing his architecture, wood furniture, sculpture, and two-dimensional creations. Escherick was a master of free form design.

Stone, wood, and stucco comprise three sections of the artist's studio built in increments as they were needed.

Stone, wood, and stucco comprise three sections of the artist’s studio built in increments as they were needed.

 

image

Color was mixed into the stucco for the tower. The fresco design represents sky, trees, and tree trunks. A free form deck emerges in the back and to the right.

 

image

Workshop painted the color of the workers blue jeans, left, and the garage at right.

The boys were in heaven at the C. F. Martin & Co., Inc., factory in Nazareth, PA, where 250 new guitars are made every day. The fabrication, assembly, and finishing is done by human hands as well as by robots. But how does a Martin guitar sound? Visitors get a chance to play them.

Paul and Pete, two boys in a candy store, try out the Martins.

Paul and Pete, two boys in a candy store, try out the Martins.

image

image
image

image
image

image

Winterthur is the mansion of the late Henry Francis du Pont. There he founded the premier museum of American decorative arts. Du Pont collected whole room interiors of period design and re-installed them in his own home. One time we visited at Yuletide, and the rooms were decorated as they would have been during the particular period. Very pretty! Only some floors are open for tours. There is just too much, impossible to see all of it. My favorite room was the Chinese Parlor where the wall covering was paper, hand painted in China.

image

Longwood Gardens is the must-see for everyone, and particularly appreciated by horticulturists, landscape architects, and lay plant lovers. Beautiful! Everything at their prime. Like Winterthur, it’s impossible to see all the acreage. DH wanted to see the Italian water fountains, and I enjoyed the views of blooming rhododendrons along the way through Peirce’s Woods, named after the family who owned the land prior to Pierre du Pont, who maintained the designed of the “rooms,” as he called the gardens within a garden.

Plein air painters enjoy lots of subject matter

Plein air painters enjoy lots of subject matter.


image

image

Italian Water Fountains

 

image

Peirce’s Woods in bloom

 

Brother Paul treated us to a private tour of Philly Shipyard where he works. It is perhaps the largest builder of new commercial ships (like Matson container ships vs. military ships) in the US. Small pieces of steel are welded to larger pieces that are welded to even larger pieces, etc., until the vessel is finished and launched. They are humongous.

image

I have to give a special shout out to Richard, Penny’s fiancé, who allowed us to ride with him in his pick-up to the Saturday-morning garage sales in Phoenixville and Collegeville. The hunt is his passion. Although the pickings were slim Memorial Day weekend, he found me a pair of brand-new Eddie Bauer shorts for a dollar. Just in time as Spring had turned to Summer in just a couple of days with temps reaching 90 degrees F.!

In between the visitor attractions we spent quality time catching up about our respective families (kids and grandkids) as well as seeing old and new friends. Hoagies, Thai food, and delicious home-cooked meals by Penny and Paul with ingredients from the fabulous Wegmans megastore…I have to mention those.

image

Pete, Penny, and Paul

Pete, Penny, and Paul

Thanks Penny and Paul for your hospitality. We had a great time. Now I’m back in Kaaawa, Oahu. It’s great, too.





Validation of an artist

4 04 2016

People who make fine art often work alone. Like writers and composers, they start with a blank canvas and require solitude to put their ideas down. Sometimes, when they think they have taken their work as far as it can go and prior to publishing, they work with a team. Working with others helps artists to develop a thick skin because one is surely to receive criticism, constructive or not.

When an artist is brave enough and has the guts to put work on display for others to see—others besides family and close friends—that is a milestone. The next step may be to price the art. Imagine: someone may want to purchase it!

Along the way, colleagues and mentors will help. Mine, Susan Rogers-Aregger, taught me everything I know about finishing paintings so that they are ready for exhibit, how to market art, and how to manage a gallery. I am so very grateful. Yesterday, her tutelage reached another high point with the opening of the group exhibit “Collages and Clay” in Kāneʻohe, Oʻahu.

 

A sparkling collage painting and ceramic masks by Susan Rogers-Aregger greet visitors to new exhibit

A sparkling collage painting and ceramic masks by Susan Rogers-Aregger greet visitors to new exhibit at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden.

 

A dozen artists, all influenced by Susan who also works in clay, combined their hand-dyed tissue paper creations and pots for an exciting display. Friends and family came to celebrate at the reception. No longer alone, we met each others’ human support system and became better acquainted with the lives of the rest of the team.

 

IMG_3816

My sister artists and new friends at the opening reception—Hiroko, Maite, and Dottie. The fat cat in the background is my creation entitled “Living Large.” It has sold!

Bob and Tommy of The Band Tantalus entertained guests with acoustic sounds. Warm to cool palettes grace the gallery walls.

Bob and Tommy of The Band Tantalus entertained guests with acoustic sounds. Warm to cool palettes grace the gallery walls.

 

By the way, artists love sales. A sale for one is a sale for all! Selling our work is how many of us make our income, and it is wonderful encouragement to keep going. Thank you!

Recently I received two emails, sent separately by two individual buyers who photographed my work in their homes and shared the images with me, to show me how they used my paintings in their decor and their artistic eye. That kind gesture took why we make art to another level of appreciation and enjoyment.

If you go— “Collages and Clay” runs through April 29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center, entrance at the end of Luluku Road, Kāneʻohe, Oʻahu.

Copyright 2016 Rebekah Luke







%d bloggers like this: