The rain barrel

11 03 2018

Installing the rain barrel we won at yesterday’s silent auction, a benefit for the Mālama Honua Public Charter School, was a satisfying Sunday project.

The Papa Ekolu (3rd graders) had donated the barrel. We had talked about getting one “just because.” And there it was, completely decorated by the kids and with a parts kit with tools and do-it-yourself installation instructions. Score!

Pete tapped it into a gutter downspout right by the garden boxes.

Cheerful barrel with hardware kit

Hauling the barrel home

Bag of parts

Diverter connects from downspout to top of barrel. Rain water exits through the spigot at the bottom where we attach a garden hose. When the barrel is full, excess water flows past and comes out normally below.

Cautionary signage

I love it!

Pete admires his final installation

Mahalo nui to Mālama Honua Public Charter School!


Rain haiku

24 02 2018


Besides a full moon
from my window I adore
soft raindrops at dawn.

No longer soft rain
tumbles into the garden,
pounds the soggy ground.

‘Twas a brief downpour.
Thank goodness we’ve had enough
of all-day-all-night.

Mistaken again!
Morning showers ‘til seven
when the sun rises.

—RL 2/24/18

Coming home

14 02 2018

From time to time I like to travel off island from Oahu.

In November we went to New York City, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Baltimore. And last week we went to Austin, TX, for a destination wedding.

Equally exciting is coming home. I always book a window seat on the starboard side of the plane for aerial views of the island.

This time I was rewarded with a beautiful clear day for these fine resolution photos made with my iPhone6s.

Puffy white clouds

The Moku Lua off Lanikai Beach; Mokapu peninsula in the distance


Beautiful Koʻolau Range



125 years after

17 01 2018

Iolani Palace in Honolulu

125 years after to the day and hour,  Hawaiians and Hawaiʻi residents observed the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy then ruled by Queen Liliʻuokalani. At 10:45 a.m. today the Hawaiian flag was raised over Iolani Palace, the same time in 1893 that it was replaced by the American flag.

Our family joined the peace march of solidarity and entered the front gates of the palace where the throng gathered for a day of remembrance.

School children, teachers and chaperones prepare to march in.

Pete and me

Hawaiian flag wearers document the approaching procession on King street.

This group will join the approaching marchers carrying flags.

Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi, the native initiative for sovereignty, adopted a blue flag with the Makaliʻi (Pleiades stars) constellation.

We helped to staff the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee information booth

Required reading: For a primer on Hawaiian history, I recommend Hawaiʻi’s Story by Hawaiʻi’s Queen by Liliʻuokalani.

Onipaʻa kākou.

On being Hawaiian

9 01 2018

Hawaiians are gearing up for a ceremonial observance on January 17 of the overthrow of Queen Liliʻuokalani 125 year’s ago. I am Hawaiian.

I won’t be marching from Mauna Ala down Nuuanu Avenue and King street to Iolani Palace as I did in 1993 for the 100th observance, but I will be near the Iolani Palace bandstand in an information booth set up by the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee. I am a citizen of Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi.

Last night I attended the first of several Mele Workshops taught by Kumu Hinaleimoana Wong to learn more about the songs of our nation. She entitled it “I Welo Mau Loa Kuʻu Hae Hawaiʻi / May my Hawaiian flag fly evermore…”

Kumu Hina

Kumu Hina wrote, “No matter the politics that divide us, let us unite through the bonds of our language, culture and our history.”

Mahalo e Kumu Hina.

I am compelled to encourage citizens to attend one of the remaining free workshops scheduled on Oahu. They are open to all. You will learn the songs, what the Hawaiian lyrics mean, and the tertiary kaona of the words. Kumu Hina’s manaʻo is inspiring and uplifting.

Schedule of Mele Workshops. Go!

125 years ago was not that long ago, Kumu Hina pointed out. When it was revealed at the workshop that I was the eldest person in the room, she said, “your grandparents’ generation.”

Yes, my maternal Chinese grandfather spoke Hawaiian, but his 15 children were forbidden to speak it in school. Unfortunately, I do not ʻōlelo either, but I love to sing Hawaiian songs.

ʻOnipaʻa kākou.

If you go ~ As I write this, the schedule of events for January 17, 2018, is flexible, except for the 10:45 a.m. raising of Hae Hawaiʻi at ʻIolani Palace, the exact time it was lowered and replaced by the American flag in 1893.

A show that celebrates peace and calm

6 01 2018

The Hoʻomaluhia New Year Invitational 2018 art show opened today with works depicting—you guessed it—Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden! At the base of the Koʻolau Mountains on Oʻahu, the park’s natural beauty is a “can’t miss” subject for any artist.

Go to the visitor center main gallery between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. any day this month through January 26 to view an inspired collection of works, including two of my oil paintings pictured below. Many are for sale. Greg Pai is the juror.

The public is invited to a reception from 4 to 6 p.m. on Sunday, January 14.

Hoʻomaluhia means “let’s make peace and tranquility.” Enter the park at the end of Luluku Road in Kāneʻohe.

Mahalo for taking an interest in art! ~ Rebekah

“Clouds Lifting Over Lanihuli” reveal fresh waterfalls. 20″x 16” oil on canvas by Rebekah Luke

“Rain Fantasy,” 24″ x 18″ oil on canvas by Rebekah Luke

Welcome 2018

1 01 2018

Welcome 2018, studio fans. Wishing you peace, a lot of hope, and more love this new year.

View from the studio near the end of 2017. The waterfall started from the mega rainfall we had on the island.

In midtown Manhattan, a couple takes a selfie. Remember to LOVE.

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