The rain barrel

11 03 2018

Installing the rain barrel we won at yesterday’s silent auction, a benefit for the Mālama Honua Public Charter School, was a satisfying Sunday project.

The Papa Ekolu (3rd graders) had donated the barrel. We had talked about getting one “just because.” And there it was, completely decorated by the kids and with a parts kit with tools and do-it-yourself installation instructions. Score!

Pete tapped it into a gutter downspout right by the garden boxes.

Cheerful barrel with hardware kit

Hauling the barrel home

Bag of parts

Diverter connects from downspout to top of barrel. Rain water exits through the spigot at the bottom where we attach a garden hose. When the barrel is full, excess water flows past and comes out normally below.

Cautionary signage

I love it!

Pete admires his final installation

Mahalo nui to Mālama Honua Public Charter School!


The things I find

15 02 2018

Today I came down with a case of cleaning frenzy in the studio. Not just cleaning, but decluttering as well. You know what I mean! Artists have a reputation of being messy, but frankly, I prefer tidy and organized so I can think more clearly.

One of the happy finds was a haiku I wrote in December 1979. I am including it here with some photo images so it won’t be lost again.


Wake up in the morn

And see the pretty sunrise

From Kaaawa

Mountains by the sea

I see the lion crouching

My own waterfall

Five white horses graze

O’er fence where grass is greener

At Kualoa

Salt spray, ocean mist

Turn on the windshield wipers

It isn’t raining

Slick bay reflections

Morningside of Oahu

Oriental hills





Coming home

14 02 2018

From time to time I like to travel off island from Oahu.

In November we went to New York City, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Baltimore. And last week we went to Austin, TX, for a destination wedding.

Equally exciting is coming home. I always book a window seat on the starboard side of the plane for aerial views of the island.

This time I was rewarded with a beautiful clear day for these fine resolution photos made with my iPhone6s.

Puffy white clouds

The Moku Lua off Lanikai Beach; Mokapu peninsula in the distance


Beautiful Koʻolau Range



125 years after

17 01 2018

Iolani Palace in Honolulu

125 years after to the day and hour,  Hawaiians and Hawaiʻi residents observed the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy then ruled by Queen Liliʻuokalani. At 10:45 a.m. today the Hawaiian flag was raised over Iolani Palace, the same time in 1893 that it was replaced by the American flag.

Our family joined the peace march of solidarity and entered the front gates of the palace where the throng gathered for a day of remembrance.

School children, teachers and chaperones prepare to march in.

Pete and me

Hawaiian flag wearers document the approaching procession on King street.

This group will join the approaching marchers carrying flags.

Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi, the native initiative for sovereignty, adopted a blue flag with the Makaliʻi (Pleiades stars) constellation.

We helped to staff the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee information booth

Required reading: For a primer on Hawaiian history, I recommend Hawaiʻi’s Story by Hawaiʻi’s Queen by Liliʻuokalani.

Onipaʻa kākou.

On being Hawaiian

9 01 2018

Hawaiians are gearing up for a ceremonial observance on January 17 of the overthrow of Queen Liliʻuokalani 125 year’s ago. I am Hawaiian.

I won’t be marching from Mauna Ala down Nuuanu Avenue and King street to Iolani Palace as I did in 1993 for the 100th observance, but I will be near the Iolani Palace bandstand in an information booth set up by the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee. I am a citizen of Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi.

Last night I attended the first of several Mele Workshops taught by Kumu Hinaleimoana Wong to learn more about the songs of our nation. She entitled it “I Welo Mau Loa Kuʻu Hae Hawaiʻi / May my Hawaiian flag fly evermore…”

Kumu Hina

Kumu Hina wrote, “No matter the politics that divide us, let us unite through the bonds of our language, culture and our history.”

Mahalo e Kumu Hina.

I am compelled to encourage citizens to attend one of the remaining free workshops scheduled on Oahu. They are open to all. You will learn the songs, what the Hawaiian lyrics mean, and the tertiary kaona of the words. Kumu Hina’s manaʻo is inspiring and uplifting.

Schedule of Mele Workshops. Go!

125 years ago was not that long ago, Kumu Hina pointed out. When it was revealed at the workshop that I was the eldest person in the room, she said, “your grandparents’ generation.”

Yes, my maternal Chinese grandfather spoke Hawaiian, but his 15 children were forbidden to speak it in school. Unfortunately, I do not ʻōlelo either, but I love to sing Hawaiian songs.

ʻOnipaʻa kākou.

If you go ~ As I write this, the schedule of events for January 17, 2018, is flexible, except for the 10:45 a.m. raising of Hae Hawaiʻi at ʻIolani Palace, the exact time it was lowered and replaced by the American flag in 1893.

Ready to receive

24 12 2017

Christmas Eve Day

Most of the presents are beside the small Christmas tree, although now as I survey the room I see that one of Santa’s elves still has some gift wrapping to do. I love the snowman.
This year we offered the studio early in December as the venue for a holiday party for some high school classmates. That was fun. Kaaawa is considered a “far” drive from anywhere else on Oahu. We started at 3 in the afternoon and folks could enjoy the scenery on the way to our place, as well as find their way in the daylight.

Mood set and home decorated, we mailed Hawaiian cards to friends and packages to family far away. Wreaths were a success again (see previous post).

My friend Kiana whose ministry is feeding houseless people (i.e., they don’t have kitchens or money for good food) planned a holiday meal for 200 and asked for help. Normally she does most of the food prep herself. I offered to bake some pies and managed eight of them. To donate those desserts was very satisfying to me. Can you understand?

Apple, pecan, pumpkin, and banana — photo by Lynette Cruz

Yesterday I baked a batch of “magic cookie bars” and divided it among our immediate neighbors. Later at a gathering Quinn, so cute, asked what they were because she didn’t get any; her brothers ate them all! I saved some that I’ll take to her today.

My hanai mom Ivalee, Pete and I enjoyed so very much the Windward Choral Society’s Christmas concert in Kailua this year. Choral Director Susan McCreary Duprey put together a fine program for her enthusiastic choir. What a lot of good energy.

I miss singing in a choir, small choirs, so my vocal coach suggested I join her church choir for Christmas Eve service. She needed a “reading alto.” Okay! That’s me, pick up singer. Tonight’s the night, 7 pm, in Kailua at Christ Church Uniting Disciples and Presbyterians.

Then, I will be ready to receive. A blessed, loving, and merry Christmas, everyone. ~ Rebekah 

Thanksgiving Day 2017

23 11 2017

Holiday bouquets for you! This year we are in Pennsylvania visiting our sister Penny and her family. We’ll return to Oahu next week. All of us from the studio wish you a warm Thanksgiving of love, health, and happiness. ~ Rebekah

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