Blessed are the children

16 04 2017

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Master paintings of the 1800s at the Bishop Museum

2 04 2017

For the final project in the Painting II class I teach, students select a painting of a master to copy using the grid system and painting section by section. The unveiling was yesterday at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum.

Nancy Alejo chose Camille Pissarro’s “The Red Roofs,” 1877, and Bernadette Chan picked Paul Gauguin’s “Parau api (Two Women of Tahiti),” 1892.

“The Red Roofs” by Nancy Alejo after Camille Pissarro

A segment of “Parau api (Two Women of Tahiti)” by Bernadette Chan after Paul Gauguin

My students selected these works independently from each other, but in their presentation, we learned that Pissarro and Gauguin became friends in 1873 and painted together. Pissarro painted with the Impressionists. Gauguin had no formal art training, and his work is post-Impressionist, flat, hard edged and considered symbolic. Pissarro gave money to Gauguin to go to Tahiti.

While at the Bishop Museum we visited The Picture Gallery on the top floor of the entrance tower of Hawaiian Hall. My favorite paintings were the landscapes by D. Howard Hitchcock and the still lifes of fruit dear to my heart (because I have had mountain apples and breadfruit in my own garden) by Margaret Girvin Gillian.

The Picture Gallery at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum. Fascinating old images of Hawaii may be viewed here.

If you go:
See www.bishopmuseum.org for how to get there and for ticket information. Admission is free on Pauahi’s birthday, Dec. 19.
From Waikiki you may take the No. 2 bus and ask the driver to let you off on School street at Kapalama street. Walk downhill toward the ocean to Bernice street and turn right to the entrance at 1525 Bernice Street.





Pictures of me and my parents

27 03 2017

Nine cousins including me met for lunch as we occasionally do, and today Millie brought an album of old photos and sweet memories. Here she is with Eileen (center) and Eileen’s daughter Marty, at right. What are they looking at that is so interesting? Why, it’s me, little Rebekah, with my dad Arthur and my mom Fo-Tsin! That watermelon sure looks good.





Join in the singing or come as the audience

14 03 2017

Festival/concert venue: Kawaiahao Church is on the corner of King and Punchbowl streets

Aloha Everyone!

Kawaiolaonāpūkanileo, our small Hawaiian-music choir presents Ke Ahe Lau Makani 2017. We invite you all to this Hawaiian choral festival on Sunday afternoon, March 26, 2017, at historic Kawaiahaʻo Church. Join us at 2pm to sing in the festival choir or at 6pm to hear this choir in concert!

The next rehearsal is at 5pm on Monday, March 20, at Na Mea Hawaii store at Ward Warehouse, Honolulu. All who love to sing Hawaiian music are welcome.

The cost is $20 to be a festival singer which includes music and a heavy pūpū before the concert. The concert at 6:00 pm is free.

Nola A. Nahulu is the director. Phil Hidalgo is the festival organizer.





Reflections ’67: yay, team!

9 02 2017

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For the family record books: Women’s March, Jan. 21, 2017

22 01 2017
Women's March participants at the Hawaii State Capitol: Pete, Perrin, Rebekah, Ayla

Pete, Perrin, Rebekah and Ayla gather at the Hawaii State Capitol on a rainy morning for the Women’s March in Honolulu. (Photo by Valerie J. Lam)

Mom and Dad had to work, so Papa (DH) and Popo (I) brought Perrin and Ayla with them to the Women’s March for the history-making demonstration the day after the 45th President was inaugurated. The 5-year-old was engaged. Her older sister, who reads signage well, seemed to take it all in with a guarded attitude. We marched in solidarity with millions of others who marched on Washington, D.C., and around the world.

Excerpt from the Mission Statement of the Women’s March on O‘ahu: “In the spirit of democracy and honoring the champions of human rights, dignity, and justice who have come before us, we join in solidarity to show presence in numbers too great to ignore, to elevate and advance issues that are important to women, families, children, and communities.”

January 21 is my mother’s birthday. If she were living, she would have turned 100 yesterday!

Hawaii Capitol and the State seal and motto: Ua mau ke ola o ka ʻāina i ka pono. The life of the land is preserved in righteousness.

Hawaii Capitol and the State seal and motto: “Ua mau ke ea o ka ʻāina i ka pono.”  The life of the land is preserved in righteousness.

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Perrin, 5, put a rainbow on the flip side to match her dress.

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Our Aunty Pat and Aunty Karen, life-long activists, display their adult messages in bold type. Photo bomber flashes the shaka sign.

 





Growing my own; sorry, mister peacock

13 01 2017
  • img_8591Good morning! The larger brussel sprout plant fell over from its weight, and I harvested the leaves. Because the plant uprooted, DH will saw up the trunk. The roaming neighborhood peacock will be disappointed. What to do with the harvest? Rinse like spinach. I’ll discard the tough stems and slice the leaves into 1-inch squares. I’ll blanch and freeze most and steam some until tender. I’ll simmer them in bone broth or vegetable broth with some chopped onion and finish off the soup with some coconut milk (being careful not to boil), salt and pepper. I am so thankful we are growing our own food. Read the rest of this entry »







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