The rain barrel

11 03 2018

Installing the rain barrel we won at yesterday’s silent auction, a benefit for the Mālama Honua Public Charter School, was a satisfying Sunday project.

The Papa Ekolu (3rd graders) had donated the barrel. We had talked about getting one “just because.” And there it was, completely decorated by the kids and with a parts kit with tools and do-it-yourself installation instructions. Score!

Pete tapped it into a gutter downspout right by the garden boxes.

Cheerful barrel with hardware kit

Hauling the barrel home

Bag of parts

Diverter connects from downspout to top of barrel. Rain water exits through the spigot at the bottom where we attach a garden hose. When the barrel is full, excess water flows past and comes out normally below.

Cautionary signage

I love it!

Pete admires his final installation

Mahalo nui to Mālama Honua Public Charter School!


Ultra art in downtown Honolulu

7 03 2018

The second floor lobby at Pauahi Tower in Honolulu, at 1003 Bishop Street, is home until August 3 for a selection of original fine art by local artists.

The location is convenient for downtown office workers who might walk over during lunch hour for some quiet visual meditation.

The lobby with its high ceilings and window walls lends itself to large pieces. Consider that my “large” contribution of “Royal Archival Banyan” in oil is hanging in a beautiful koa display case.

Display case features both two- and three-dimensional works.

Glass case containing 2D and 3D art reflects high-rise downtown parking garage for a fourth dimension.

Unusual art that caught my eye were a collage by David Friedman, and three smaller pieces: a fish and a couple of decorated fishing floats.

Collage art by David Friedman

Spheres, one a former fishing float.


Windward Artists Guild and Wendy Roberts organized the exhibit entitled Ultra Exhibit I. Katherine Love was the curator.

For information about purchasing any of the art, please email Wendy Roberts at

If you go: Alii Place parking garage has reasonable fees. Enter from the right hand lane of Alakea street between King and Hotel streets. Pauahi Tower is one block from Alakea on Bishop street.


Rain haiku

24 02 2018


Besides a full moon
from my window I adore
soft raindrops at dawn.

No longer soft rain
tumbles into the garden,
pounds the soggy ground.

‘Twas a brief downpour.
Thank goodness we’ve had enough
of all-day-all-night.

Mistaken again!
Morning showers ‘til seven
when the sun rises.

—RL 2/24/18

The things I find

15 02 2018

Today I came down with a case of cleaning frenzy in the studio. Not just cleaning, but decluttering as well. You know what I mean! Artists have a reputation of being messy, but frankly, I prefer tidy and organized so I can think more clearly.

One of the happy finds was a haiku I wrote in December 1979. I am including it here with some photo images so it won’t be lost again.


Wake up in the morn

And see the pretty sunrise

From Kaaawa

Mountains by the sea

I see the lion crouching

My own waterfall

Five white horses graze

O’er fence where grass is greener

At Kualoa

Salt spray, ocean mist

Turn on the windshield wipers

It isn’t raining

Slick bay reflections

Morningside of Oahu

Oriental hills





Coming home

14 02 2018

From time to time I like to travel off island from Oahu.

In November we went to New York City, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Baltimore. And last week we went to Austin, TX, for a destination wedding.

Equally exciting is coming home. I always book a window seat on the starboard side of the plane for aerial views of the island.

This time I was rewarded with a beautiful clear day for these fine resolution photos made with my iPhone6s.

Puffy white clouds

The Moku Lua off Lanikai Beach; Mokapu peninsula in the distance


Beautiful Koʻolau Range



Super blue moon eclipse

31 01 2018

iPhone photography by Rebekah Luke

125 years after

17 01 2018

Iolani Palace in Honolulu

125 years after to the day and hour,  Hawaiians and Hawaiʻi residents observed the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy then ruled by Queen Liliʻuokalani. At 10:45 a.m. today the Hawaiian flag was raised over Iolani Palace, the same time in 1893 that it was replaced by the American flag.

Our family joined the peace march of solidarity and entered the front gates of the palace where the throng gathered for a day of remembrance.

School children, teachers and chaperones prepare to march in.

Pete and me

Hawaiian flag wearers document the approaching procession on King street.

This group will join the approaching marchers carrying flags.

Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi, the native initiative for sovereignty, adopted a blue flag with the Makaliʻi (Pleiades stars) constellation.

We helped to staff the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee information booth

Required reading: For a primer on Hawaiian history, I recommend Hawaiʻi’s Story by Hawaiʻi’s Queen by Liliʻuokalani.

Onipaʻa kākou.

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