Hōkūleʻa comes home

18 06 2017

After visiting 23 countries and territories around the world over the past three years, the double-hulled sailing canoe Hōkūleʻa has returned to Hawaiʻi and was greeted yesterday at Magic Island, Ala Moana Park, Oahu, by an estimated 50,000 people. A friend and his wife invited me to their hotel suite 26 floors above for a bird’s eye view of the homecoming.

Magic Island is the green peninsula in the middle of the photo, above Ala Wai Boat Harbor.

Seven other double-hulled waʻa (canoes) came, too, in this historical event to honor Polynesian voyaging and celestial navigation.

Graphic courtesy of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs

The best way for me to emphasize the importance of Hōkūleʻa (Hawaiian for “Star of Gladness”) is to share with you the address by Hawaiian voyager Nainoa Thompson to the crowd. It is the speech of his life. Powerful. You may hear it here. For the children. http://www.kitv.com/Clip/13421484/nainoa-thompson-speaks-at-hokulea-homecoming#.WUa4gg2bsMQ.email





Joe Kaakua and a snippet of my high school reunion

13 06 2017

Our Punahou School Class of 1967’s 50th reunion is now a pleasant memory shared with a gazillion photos and well wishes on Facebook. After many activities on both Hawaii and Oahu islands, including the annual Alumni Luau on campus that honors the 50th Year class especially, the finale was a picnic at our classmate’s family’s large rural estate.

Me and Joe after the Memorial Service for our classmates who died. Joe played his ukulele for our choir that I directed.

Hats off to my buddy Joseph Kaakua who organized the event and his wife Joann (we call her Girly), his right hand. Joe requested my now-celebrated mountain apple pie for the picnic. “Maybe two,” he said. Well, you can’t say no to Joe.

But was he kidding? That’s not enough for 150-200.  So I made more than two!

Mountain apple (ʻōhiʻa ʻai in Hawaiian) pies. The fresh fruit tastes a bit like a pear. My pie resembles rhubarb.

(Copyright 2017 Rebekah Luke)

(Photos by Valerie Lam)





Our most recent Punahou graduate

4 06 2017

Lei and more lei for James. So many that he is about to present me with one of white ginger. His older sister Anna came from Minnesota.

Eleven thirty Saturday night. Just returned from Honolulu where my hanai nephew James David Yoshimura Sinclair was graduated with honors from Punahou School. I am so proud of him. It was a long commencement ceremony but very exciting for the grads. They will be partying until morning. The Blaisdell arena was filled to capacity. Our seats in the balcony gave me a bird’s eye view, too far for me to get good close-up photos. Here, instead, are images of James being greeted by his family afterwards.

Grandma Ivalee Sinclair and James Sinclair

Anna, mother Dawn, James, cousin Trinity, uncle Karl, and father Dr. Brian Sinclair, MD

Immediate family: Parents Dr. Brian and Dawn Sinclair, sister Anna, and James

James and his Aunt Ruth Sinclair

Me and my hanai mom Ivalee Sinclair, James’s grandmother

Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

 

 





June morning haiku

2 06 2017

Walked down to the shore.

High tide. Looming offshore rain.

Walked beach anyway.

 





Hawaii, land of the flower lei

1 05 2017

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Blessed are the children

16 04 2017

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All he needs are strings

5 04 2017

My darling husband Pete is building his seventh ukulele out of a cigar box. Most are concert scale; this one is a tenor. When gathering materials, he looks for cigar boxes that will accommodate the bridge of the instrument.

Polishing with Tru-Oil  gun stock finish. “This one is more show than go,” he said.

Box originally contained “25 cigars hand made in Spanish Honduras.”

The lid becomes the back of the ukulele, and the front of the box is removed and replaced with Engelmann spruce wood. Sometimes he adds a pickup inside.

Decorative inlaid fingerboard came from Vietnam. Pete put in the paua mother of pearl from Aotearoa around the sound hole.

The black tuners called Pegheds are geared, a little more sophisticated than straight pegs.

All the ukulele needs now are strings!








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